Saturday, October 31, 2009

Today In History.............

In 1512.............

Michelangelo Buonarroti's masterpiece, the fresco on the ceiling of the Sistine Chapel was first presented to the public. It received rave reviews at the time and still does today.


In 1517.............

Martin Luther posted his 95 theses on the door of the Wittenburg Palace church marking the beginning of the Protestant Reformation in Germany, and eventually some of the bloodiest wars in Europe to that point. As it was said, with so many thinking God was on their side, the question was who was on God's side?

In 1917.............

800 Troopers of the 4th Australian Light Horse (mounted infantry) took part in what many historians consider the last cavalry charge in history. They assaulted and captured the Turkish fortress town of Beersheba, Palestine. After a 4 mile gallop, under constant artillery, machine gun and rifle fire, the Australians got through the barbed-wire barricades and crossed two trench lines before entering the town. In the assault the Australians lost 31 men K.I.A. and 36 wounded. In return, they captured 750 Turks, 9 artillery pieces, 3 machine guns and large quantities of munitions and supplies. This action also served to turn the flank of Turkish defenses in Palestine, leading to the fall of Jerusalem two months later. The rest of Palestine fell soon after.

Just goes to show you what a highly motivated individual with a rifle, bayonet and horse can accomplish.

2 comments:

Brigid said...

I was raised Luthern (Norwegian/Swedish Mom) so I remember the whole Martin Luther history.

Thanks for keeping it all alive for those of us that forget that our era is not the only one worth noting.

Michael W. said...

Thanks!

I hope that my little historical notes remind people that we are constantly influenced by what has gone on in our history, sometimes for the good, sometimes for the bad, but always influenced. Call it the frustrated history teacher in me. I guess that's why I go to historic sites dressed in clothing that went out of style both 235 years and 149 years ago. -grin-